The Latest

Jul 23, 2014 / 3,845 notes
Jul 23, 2014 / 876 notes

creepyartetc:

Artist: Toru Kamei

More creepy art

(via abracadabra-macabre)

templeofapelles:

Viktor Vasnetsov
Jul 23, 2014 / 16 notes

templeofapelles:

Viktor Vasnetsov

(via abracadabra-macabre)

mirroir:

Agnolo di Cosimo (1503–1572), Portrait of a Young Man (detail), c. 1550 (x)
Jul 23, 2014 / 2,795 notes

mirroir:

Agnolo di Cosimo (1503–1572), Portrait of a Young Man (detail), c. 1550 (x)

(via ancient-serpent)

Jul 22, 2014 / 158 notes
nemfrog:

Moon’s path. 1888 & 1889.
Jul 22, 2014 / 1,498 notes

nemfrog:

Moon’s path. 1888 & 1889.

(via thephysicalisanillusion)

ifoundoutatzeropoint:

slavetothisdream:

make me choose → Understanding or Give Unto Me 
asked by demarzi

my favorite <3
Jul 11, 2014 / 162 notes

ifoundoutatzeropoint:

slavetothisdream:

make me chooseUnderstanding or Give Unto Me

asked by demarzi

my favorite <3

corporisfabrica:

An ‘unusual’ iris melanoma, a relatively uncommon type of eye tumour which here has caused a series of brown markings across the iris. Illustration by Sharon Weilbacher.
Jul 10, 2014 / 714 notes

corporisfabrica:

An ‘unusual’ iris melanoma, a relatively uncommon type of eye tumour which here has caused a series of brown markings across the iris. 
Illustration by Sharon Weilbacher.

(via scientificillustration)

j4ndr4:

The pomegranates are not only linked to Persephone but also to Aphrodite and Hera.

The pomegranate was sacred to Aphrodite who was said to have first planted it on the island of Kypros. The fruit symbolised female fertility and the marital loss of virginity with the consumation of marriage (from both its red stains and rich seeds).Source: Theoi Greek Mythology


In the ancient &amp; medieval worlds, pomegranates symbolized birth &amp; death, being itself capable of bleeding. It was frequently associated with maidens &amp; maiden-goddesses …. It had simultaneous positive &amp; negative associations, as cthonic divinities, &amp; in particular Earth mothers, were the sources of Life &amp; of Death, of Health &amp; of Illness, of Fertility &amp; Infertility.
…………….
Pomegranate as Forbidden Desire was also a component of its meaning within Athena’s Parthenon, but the forbidden desire to eat of the fruit also underlays the Persephone myth &amp; numerous Pomegranate legends.………….In Jewish lore it was again the fruit of things forbidden, growing upon the Tree of Knowledge (of sexuality &amp; death) forbidden to Adam &amp; Eve*.
The Pomegranate of Ancient Myth

* It depends on the version. For some people, the forbidden fruit is an apple or a pomegranate.
Image: Pomegranate Salt &amp; Pepper Shakers
Jul 10, 2014 / 285 notes

j4ndr4:

The pomegranates are not only linked to Persephone but also to Aphrodite and Hera.

The pomegranate was sacred to Aphrodite who was said to have first planted it on the island of Kypros. The fruit symbolised female fertility and the marital loss of virginity with the consumation of marriage (from both its red stains and rich seeds).

Source: Theoi Greek Mythology

In the ancient & medieval worlds, pomegranates symbolized birth & death, being itself capable of bleeding. It was frequently associated with maidens & maiden-goddesses …. It had simultaneous positive & negative associations, as cthonic divinities, & in particular Earth mothers, were the sources of Life & of Death, of Health & of Illness, of Fertility & Infertility.

…………….


Pomegranate as Forbidden Desire was also a component of its meaning within Athena’s Parthenon, but the forbidden desire to eat of the fruit also underlays the Persephone myth & numerous Pomegranate legends.

………….

In Jewish lore it was again the fruit of things forbidden, growing upon the Tree of Knowledge (of sexuality & death) forbidden to Adam & Eve*.

The Pomegranate of Ancient Myth

* It depends on the version. For some people, the forbidden fruit is an apple or a pomegranate.

Image: Pomegranate Salt & Pepper Shakers

(via classicsenthusiast)

Jul 10, 2014 / 83 notes

Anne Zahalka. The Mathematician, 1994. Ilfachrome print edition of 5, 73 x 96 cm.
Jul 7, 2014 / 5,524 notes

Anne Zahalka. The Mathematician, 1994. Ilfachrome print edition of 5, 73 x 96 cm.

(via ancient-serpent)

Jul 6, 2014 / 27,712 notes

(via iinsaniitea)

chapelkill:

Chapelkill Library
New in the “Weird Fiction” section, Blackwood’s magnificent, The Insanity of Jones and Other Tales. Reserve it now at the Front Desk.
Jul 6, 2014 / 164 notes

chapelkill:

Chapelkill Library

New in the “Weird Fiction” section, Blackwood’s magnificent, The Insanity of Jones and Other Tales. Reserve it now at the Front Desk.

(via ancient-serpent)

scrappadoir:

Yoshitaka Amano 
Jul 6, 2014 / 47 notes

scrappadoir:

Yoshitaka Amano 

(via mydeadpony)

Jul 6, 2014 / 2,483 notes